Accessibility

Accessibility is the word used to describe whether a product (for example, a website, mobile site, digital TV interface or application) can be used by people of all abilities and disabilities. For instance, a website is accessible if all people, including disabled and elderly people, can use it.

At Aspire Wellbeing, we aim to ensure that our website is informative and entertaining to use, as well as being accessible – this is called usability. On a website, accessibility depends on how a person’s disability affects the way they perceive information on a page and how they navigate within and between pages.

Elements that affect accessibility include:

At Aspire Wellbeing, our accessibility policy takes into account these factors wherever possible. The internet can be a great enabler and source of freedom for disabled users. As such, the value of Aspire Wellbeing (and the wider web) to our disabled and aging audiences depends on its accessibility.

This is an area of importance for Aspire Wellbeing. In keeping with our public-service remit, and our obligations under the Equality Act, we are committed to ensuring that Aspire Wellbeing digital services are as accessible to disabled and elderly people as reasonably possible.

We aim for a consistently high level of usability for our entire audience, following best-practice accessibility guidelines. We have engaged with disabled, non-disabled and elderly people throughout website development to fully understand user requirements and to ensure that we have produced a website that meets these needs. When a website is correctly designed, developed and edited, all users have equal access to the site’s information, functionality and benefits.

Aspire Wellbeing aims to make our website accessible and usable for people of all abilities and disabilities, including older audiences, and those with visual, hearing, cognitive or motor impairments.

Many people use assistive technologies to allow them, for example, to view websites in easier-to-read colours, with larger fonts or as spoken text, or to navigate around a site using the keyboard only.

As these assistive technologies become more available and sophisticated, Aspire Wellbeing wants to ensure that our website continues to work well with them to deliver a good experience for all our users.

In instances where the specific accessibility needs of some disabled user groups require Aspire Wellbeing to create new or repurposed editorial content, we will do this, wherever appropriate, so that we become more inclusive to a wider online audience.

The web content accessibility guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 also drive our approach to website accessibility. http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/REC-WCAG20-20081211/

Other helpful information can be found on the W3C website. WC3 stands for the World Wide Web Consortium. It is an international community that develops open standards to ensure the long-term growth of the Web. http://www.w3.org/

We also recommend that our website users visit the BBC accessibility web page. You will find a lot of useful information on how to improve your online experience.http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility

We welcome feedback from our users: please contact health@aspirewellbeing.org with any helpful comments and criticisms. We will use this information to help us to improve the accessibility of our website to all users, including disabled and elderly people.

Accessibility

Accessibility is the word used to describe whether a product (for example, a website, mobile site, digital TV interface or application) can be used by people of all abilities and disabilities. For instance, a website is accessible if all people, including disabled and elderly people, can use it.

At Aspire Wellbeing, we aim to ensure that our website is informative and entertaining to use, as well as being accessible – this is called usability. On a website, accessibility depends on how a person’s disability affects the way they perceive information on a page and how they navigate within and between pages.

Elements that affect accessibility include:

At Aspire Wellbeing, our accessibility policy takes into account these factors wherever possible. The internet can be a great enabler and source of freedom for disabled users. As such, the value of Aspire Wellbeing (and the wider web) to our disabled and aging audiences depends on its accessibility.

This is an area of importance for Aspire Wellbeing. In keeping with our public-service remit, and our obligations under the Equality Act, we are committed to ensuring that Aspire Wellbeing digital services are as accessible to disabled and elderly people as reasonably possible.

We aim for a consistently high level of usability for our entire audience, following best-practice accessibility guidelines. We have engaged with disabled, non-disabled and elderly people throughout website development to fully understand user requirements and to ensure that we have produced a website that meets these needs. When a website is correctly designed, developed and edited, all users have equal access to the site’s information, functionality and benefits.

Aspire Wellbeing aims to make our website accessible and usable for people of all abilities and disabilities, including older audiences, and those with visual, hearing, cognitive or motor impairments.

Many people use assistive technologies to allow them, for example, to view websites in easier-to-read colours, with larger fonts or as spoken text, or to navigate around a site using the keyboard only.

As these assistive technologies become more available and sophisticated, Aspire Wellbeing wants to ensure that our website continues to work well with them to deliver a good experience for all our users.

In instances where the specific accessibility needs of some disabled user groups require Aspire Wellbeing to create new or repurposed editorial content, we will do this, wherever appropriate, so that we become more inclusive to a wider online audience.

The web content accessibility guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 also drive our approach to website accessibility. http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/REC-WCAG20-20081211/

Other helpful information can be found on the W3C website. WC3 stands for the World Wide Web Consortium. It is an international community that develops open standards to ensure the long-term growth of the Web. http://www.w3.org/

We also recommend that our website users visit the BBC accessibility web page. You will find a lot of useful information on how to improve your online experience.http://www.bbc.co.uk/accessibility

We welcome feedback from our users: please contact health@aspirewellbeing.org with any helpful comments and criticisms. We will use this information to help us to improve the accessibility of our website to all users, including disabled and elderly people.